• Kym Pasqualini

Ted Bundy's Victims: Lynda Ann Healy

Updated: Feb 21, 2020


Lynda Ann Healy abducted from her Seattle home on January 31, 1974.
Lynda Ann Healy

Ted Bundy once called himself the only man with a Ph.D. in serial murder. He was proud of the fact that he abducted, raped, and murdered approximately 30 women between 1974 and 1978. The true number of victims will never be known, but experts suspect there may have been up to 100. Lynda Ann Healy was one of them.


Ted Bundy's early life


Ted Bundy was born Theodore Robert Cowell to Eleanor “Louise” Cowell at the Lund Home for Unwed Mothers in Burlington, Vermont, on November 24, 1946. His father’s identity was never determined with any degree of certainty. However, some of Bundy’s relatives suspected he might have been fathered by Louise’s abusive father Samuel Cowell.


For the first few years of his life, Bundy lived in the home of his maternal grandparents Samuel and Eleanor Cowell in Philadelphia. They elected to raise him as their own son to avoid the social stigmas of their daughter having a child out of wedlock. The Cowell’s told him his mother Louise was his old sister. According to author Anne Rule, who wrote “The Stranger Beside Me,” Bundy found out about his true parentage around 1969 and harbored a lifelong resentment toward his mother for never mentioning his biological father.



Ted Bundy's parents Eleanor "Louise" Cowell and John Bundy.
Ted Bundy's parents Eleanor "Louise" Cowell and John Bundy.

In 1951, Louise moved to Washington state and married John Bundy, who adopted Ted, giving him his name. Their family expanded, as Louise and John had four children together. Linda was born in 1952, followed by a son, Glen, in 1954. Another girl, Sandra, was born in 1956, and Richard, their last child, was born in 1961.


Ted Bundy's childhood home in Tacoma, Washington.
Ted Bundy's childhood home in Tacoma, Washington.

When Ted was in the second grade, the Bundy family purchased a home at 658 N. Skyline Drive in Tacoma, fairly close to Narrows Bridge. About the time Bundy was graduating Wilson High School in the spring of 1965, the Bundy family sold the home on Skyline and moved into another home.


Author Anne Rule, who had become a good friend to Bundy, believes he began murdering in his teenage years. Bundy repeatedly avoided this topic over the years, refusing to tell authorities when he started his rampage.


A teenage Ted Bundy (right), with his mother and siblings.
A teenage Ted Bundy (right), with his mother and siblings.

Bundy displayed sexual deviancy throughout his childhood and adolescence. During his college years, Bundy would consume large amounts of alcohol and “canvas the community” late at night, looking through open curtains to watch women undress.


When recollecting his childhood in Tacoma, Washington, Bundy told biographers Michaud and Aynesworth that he would rummage through neighborhood garbage bins searching for pictures of naked women. During high school, Bundy was arrested twice on suspicion of burglary and auto theft. In addition, circumstantial evidence dating back to Bundy’s childhood connects him to the disappearance of his neighbor 8-year old Anne Marie Burr in Tacoma on August 31, 1961.


Bundy also showed a promising career in politics. After graduating from the University of Washington (UW) in 1972, Bundy joined Washington Governor Daniel J. Evans’ re-election campaign. After Evans was re-elected, Bundy was hired as an assistant to Ross Davis, Chairman of the Washington State Republican Party. Davis thought highly of Bundy, describing him as “smart, aggressive, and a believer in the system.”


Many of Bundy’s victims regarded him as charismatic and handsome, traits he exploited to win the trust of many of his young victims. He typically feigned a disability or injury to gain the young women’s trust before overpowering them and abducting them to secluded locations.


With an almost mythical status, Bundy has long held the attention of the public.

During his televised court proceedings, people were captivated by the horrific nature of his crimes and by his strange fascination with his own psychology. During the trial, Bundy was like a cult leader, with women in the courtroom seeking just a glance at the Jekyll and Hyde who became known as America’s most notorious serial killer.


Ted Bundy with his girlfriend Elizabeth Kloepfer in 1974.
Ted Bundy with his girlfriend Elizabeth Kloepfer in 1974.

America's most notorious serial killer


Bundy was not a gentleman and shouldn’t even be described as human. A sexual pervert, Bundy would engage in mutilation and necrophilia with the corpses of his victims. Some victims he would visit for days after he killed them. Sometimes he cut off their heads with a hacksaw so he could admire their faces in his apartment. He then threw their heads into the forest once he tired of them. Bundy told detectives he even disposed of and burned one victim’s head in his girlfriend’s apartment fireplace when she was not at home.


Some of his victim’s bodies were badly decomposed when found by authorities, and the cause of death was hard to determine. However, on others, forensic evidence reflected he would keep his victims alive for days before he killed them. Some bodies were found with newly painted fingernails, washed hair, and fresh makeup.


No, Bundy was not a “gentleman killer” but a monster of the most sadistic and evil proportions.


Many books, documentaries, and movies about Bundy tell his side of the story, neglecting to highlight the truly horrific nature of his crimes. Many fail altogether to tell the stories of his victims. Who were they? What kind of people were they? Who might they have become had Bundy not become intertwined with their fate?


To keep a loved one’s memory alive after they have died, one must continue to say their name. Throughout this article, I will be referring to these young women by their first names.


Lynda Ann Healy was Ted Bundy’s first accounted victim, abducted from her home in Seattle on January 31, 1974.
Lynda Ann Healy was Ted Bundy’s first accounted victim, abducted from her home in Seattle on January 31, 1974.

Lynda Ann Healy


Lynda Ann Healy was born in 1952 and was so beautiful she could have been a model. She had long auburn hair, sparkly big blue eyes, and a ready smile. Lynda was 21 years old and a popular student at the University of Washington (UW), majoring in psychology. She often worked with children with disabilities and loved the opportunity to help others.


According to the book The Only Living Witness: The True Story of Serial Killer Ted Bundy, Lynda had grown up in an upper-class comfortable neighborhood in the suburbs with her parents and two siblings. Described as an above-average student and talented musician, Lynda was described as full of life and self-assurance who went everywhere with her camera.


A dedicated student, who lived in an off-campus home in Seattle, Lynda was known for her morning weather and ski reports on a local radio station. She was bright and responsible and had her entire life before her.


The home at 5517 12th Street NE in Seattle, where Lynda Healy resided with her roommates.
The home at 5517 12th Street NE in Seattle, where Lynda Healy resided with her roommates.

The day before Lynda vanished was like any other day. Lynda got up at 5:30 a.m. and went to her job at Northwest Ski Reports to make her weather report. After work, she headed off to classes, and later that day had planned to attend the afternoon chorus practice on the UW campus.


Lynda had m